Research

Cognitive on the Continent

By Thomas H. Davenport, Oct 19, 2017

There is little doubt that the United States is the most active market for cognitive technologies, but it is hardly the only one. There is also considerable interest in the technology in Europe, and a number of projects are underway in relatively sophisticated organizations.

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The breadth of analytics has certainly increased in recent years. So, too, has the pool of people who dip their toe into creating analytics of one sort or the other. The trends toward democratization of data and self-service analytical capabilities are powerful and both have driven a lot of value for organizations in recent years. At the same time, it is possible to go too far.

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Resuscitating a lifelong dream with data science

By Sarmila Basu, Oct 05, 2017

Thousands of people die every year from a common infection that you can get when you go to the hospital. It’s called Clostridium Difficile 101 (or CDIFF for short), and people get infected with it 500,000 times per year, and devastatingly, it kills 29,000 people per year in the U.S. How are data scientists like those on my Data and Decision Sciences team in Microsoft IT able to help?

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Disintegrating Castles & Category Kings

By Geoffrey Moore, Oct 03, 2017

The most prevalent impact of digitalization on the structure of markets has been to reduce the barriers to entry for a whole raft of established categories—as it has, for example in media, retail, consumer packaged goods, fast food, and transportation. A flood of small but numerous new entrants, individually nothing more than minor nuisances, become collectively a real presence. This shows up in market-share pie charts where the catch-all category Other is growing faster than the market as a whole. The result in each case is category fragmentation, and the big loser in each case is the currently reigning category king.

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For the many years that I have been researching IT, there has always been a clear distinction between certain types of applications. These classic distinctions, however, are breaking down—in large part because of emerging technologies like the Internet of Things (IoT) and artificial intelligence (AI).

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Transform.AI brought together enterprise and startup CEOs, economists, technologists, venture capitalists, and journalists. We discussed the myths and realities of the economic impact of AI, enterprise applications of AI, the ethical questions surrounding AI, and the state of what’s possible in the field. Here is part three of the highlights.

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Yes, Artificial Intelligence Is Analytics

By Bill Franks, Sep 14, 2017

There seems to be some confusion as to exactly what artificial intelligence (AI) is, and how the discipline of AI should be categorized. Is AI a form of analytics or is it a totally new discipline that is distinct from analytics? I firmly believe that AI is more closely related to predictive analytics and data science than to any other discipline. One might even argue that AI is the next generation of predictive analytics. Additionally, AI is often utilized in situations where it is necessary to operationalize the analytics process. So, in that sense, AI is also often pushing the envelope of prescriptive, operationalized analytics. It would be a mistake to say that AI is not a form of analytics.

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Transform.AI brought together enterprise and startup CEOs, economists, technologists, venture capitalists, and journalists. We discussed the myths and realities of the economic impact of AI, enterprise applications of AI, the ethical questions surrounding AI, and the state of what’s possible in the field. Here is part two of the highlights.

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Transform.AI brought together enterprise and startup CEOs, economists, technologists, venture capitalists, and journalists. We discussed the myths and realities of the economic impact of AI, enterprise applications of AI, the ethical questions surrounding AI, and the state of what’s possible in the field. Here are some highlights.

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Sarmila Basu’s team of data scientists is using machine learning and modeling to save Microsoft millions of dollars on heating, cooling, and other facilities maintenance costs.

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